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2021-05-27

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty provides a context for the relationship between the Crown, iwi and Māori. Ensuring Māori students enjoy and achieve education success as Māori is a joint responsibility of the Crown (represented by the Ministry of Education and other education sector agencies/departments) and iwi, hapū and whānau.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi still important today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

What if there was no Treaty of Waitangi?

Another easy answer is that with no treaty there would be no argument about whether, in signing the treaty, iwi ceded sovereignty, as the English version says. In the te reo version they didn’t.

Why did people not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Māori who agreed to sign did so because they wanted the British to govern, which means to make laws about behaviour. Many people today believe that most Māori would not have signed the Treaty if the Māori version had used ‘rangatiratanga’ for ‘sovereignty’.

Why is there a Treaty of Waitangi?

The purpose of the Treaty was to enable the British settlers and the Māori people to live together in New Zealand under a common set of laws or agreements. The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What were the effects of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840.

How many chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi in total?

500 chiefs

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi controversial?

More than 40 Māori chiefs signed a treaty with the British Crown in the Bay of Islands. The Treaty of Waitangi remains controversial. After Hobson spoke in English, Henry Williams explained in Māori that the treaty was an act of love by the Queen and Busby emphasised that it protected land rights.

Who was eligible to sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

What is the difference between Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the Treaty of Waitangi?

Te Tiriti: They gave the Queen te kawanatanga katoa, the complete government over their land. The Treaty: Māori chiefs and people, collectively and individually, were confirmed in and guaranteed full exclusive and undisturbed possession of their lands and estates, forests, fisheries, and other properties.

What was the impact of the Treaty of Waitangi to the Maori?

It also gave the Crown a right to deal with Māori in buying land. The English version gave chiefs ‘exclusive and undisturbed possession’ of lands, forests, fisheries and other property. It also gave the Crown an exclusive right to deal with Māori over buying land.

What is freehold Maori?

Māori freehold land This is land where Māori customary interests have been converted to freehold title by the Māori Land Court or its predecessors by a freehold order.

Who can own Maori freehold land?

Māori Freehold Land is held by individuals who have shares together as tenants in common. In a modern context it has two main characteristics which make it a unique land tenure: economic value. cultural value.