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2021-05-26

What medication is used for variceal bleeding?

What medication is used for variceal bleeding?

Beta blockers — Beta blockers, which are traditionally used to treat high blood pressure, are the most commonly recommended medication to prevent bleeding from varices. Beta blockers decrease pressure inside of the varices, which can reduce the risk of bleeding by 45 to 50 percent [1].

How do you stop a GI bleed?

To help prevent a GI bleed:

  1. Limit your use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
  2. Limit your use of alcohol.
  3. If you smoke, quit.
  4. If you have GERD , follow your doctor’s instructions for treating it.

When do you feed a patient with gastrointestinal bleeding?

In patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to an ulcer with high risk of rebleeding (Forrest I–IIb) or with variceal bleeding it is recommended to wait at least 48 h after endoscopic therapy before initiating oral or enteral feeding.

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What are the symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding?

What are the symptoms of GI bleeding?

  • black or tarry stool.
  • bright red blood in vomit.
  • cramps in the abdomen.
  • dark or bright red blood mixed with stool.
  • dizziness or faintness.
  • feeling tired.
  • paleness.
  • shortness of breath.

When should a patient with a Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleed be fed?

Approximately 50% of patients are classified as low risk for rebleeding and can be safely fed immediately and discharged early, even on the same day as endoscopy. Only the patients with a high risk of rebleeding should be kept nil per os and be hospitalized for at least 72 hours after endoscopic treatment.

What can I eat if I have GI bleeding?

The bleeding may make you lose iron. So it’s important to eat foods that have a lot of iron. These include red meat, shellfish, poultry, and eggs. They also include beans, raisins, whole-grain breads, and leafy green vegetables.

How long is NPO for GI bleed?

In patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to an ulcer with high risk of rebleeding (Forrest I-IIb) or with variceal bleeding it is recommended to wait at least 48 h after endoscopic therapy before initiating oral or enteral feeding.

How do you test for gastrointestinal bleeding?

Tests that may be done include:

  1. Abdominal CT scan.
  2. Abdominal MRI scan.
  3. Abdominal x-ray.
  4. Angiography.
  5. Bleeding scan (tagged red blood cell scan)
  6. Blood clotting tests.
  7. Capsule endoscopy (camera pill that is swallowed to look at the small intestine)
  8. Colonoscopy.
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What lab values change with a GI bleed?

Hemoglobin (P = 0.023), total protein (P = 0.0002), and lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.009) were significantly lower in patients with upper GI bleeding than those with lower. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) was higher in patients with upper GI bleeding than those with in lower GI bleeding (P = 0.0065).

What vital signs would you expect to see in GI bleeding?

General examination focuses on vital signs and other indicators of shock or hypovolemia (eg, tachycardia, tachypnea, pallor, diaphoresis, oliguria, confusion) and anemia (eg, pallor, diaphoresis). Patients with lesser degrees of bleeding may simply have mild tachycardia (heart rate > 100) or no signs at all.

Which test is more sensitive to upper GI bleeding?

SENSA was more sensitive than HO II in all blood ingestion groups. At least one positive SENSA test was present in 50% of subjects ingesting 10 ml of blood (each 3 and 5 day groups) and in all subjects ingesting 20 ml/day.

What foods help with internal bleeding?