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2021-05-14

Which of the following describes the probability of hemophilia in the offspring of a man who does not have hemophilia and a woman whose father is a hemophiliac?

Which of the following describes the probability of hemophilia in the offspring of a man who does not have hemophilia and a woman whose father is a hemophiliac?

Hemophilia is a sex-linked recessive trait. Which of the following describes the probability of hemophilia in the offspring of a man who does not have hemophilia and a woman whose father is a hemophiliac? None of their daughters will have hemophilia. Alleles for the A and B blood cell antigens are codominant.

What is the probability that a son will be a hemophiliac?

There is a 50% chance that each son will have hemophilia. There is a 50% chance that each daughter will be a carrier of the hemophilia gene.

Why Haemophilia is common in males?

This means that males only have one copy of most of the genes on the X chromosome, whereas females have 2 copies. Thus, males can have a disease like hemophilia if they inherit an affected X chromosome that has a mutation in either the factor VIII or factor IX gene.

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What gender is most affected by hemophilia?

Due to the sex-linkage of the disorder, the prominence amongst male is greater than in females. Although the disorder mainly affects males, females can be carriers of the affected gene and experience symptoms. Hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder.

Why Haemophilia is rare in female?

Hemophilia is a rare blood disease that usually occurs in males. In fact, it’s extremely rare for women to be born with the condition because of the way it’s passed down genetically. A female would need to inherit two copies of the faulty gene — one from each parent — to develop hemophilia A, B or C.

Why are females carriers of hemophilia?

A female who inherits one affected X chromosome becomes a “carrier” of hemophilia. She can pass the affected gene on to her children. In addition, a female who is a carrier sometimes can have symptoms of hemophilia. In fact, some doctors describe these women as having mild hemophilia.

What triggers phenylketonuria?

Causes of phenylketonuria PKU is an inherited condition caused by a defect in the PAH gene. The PAH gene helps create phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme responsible for breaking down phenylalanine. A dangerous buildup of phenylalanine can occur when someone eats high-protein foods, such as eggs and meat.

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How does PKU affect the brain?

PKU affects the brain. High blood Phe levels can cause disruptions in neurotransmitters like serotonin and dopamine, which are important for mood, learning, memory, and motivation. In addition to disrupting neurotransmitter balance, Phe itself can be directly toxic to the brain.

How does PKU affect the body?

Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a treatable disorder that affects the way the body processes protein. Children with PKU cannot use a part of the protein called phenylalanine. If left untreated, phenylalanine builds up in the bloodstream and causes brain damage.

Can PKU be inherited?

PKU is inherited in families in an autosomal recessive pattern. Autosomal recessive inheritance means that a person has two copies of the gene that is altered. Usually, each parent of an individual who has PKU carries one copy of the altered gene.