Close

2021-05-15

Which of the following best describes evidence from biochemistry that a geneticist studying evolutionary relationships might use to determine that two species are not closely related?

Which of the following best describes evidence from biochemistry that a geneticist studying evolutionary relationships might use to determine that two species are not closely related?

Which of the following best describes evidence from biochemistry that a geneticist studying evolutionary relationships might use to determine that two species are NOT closely related? Each species has a different reproductive mechanism. One species has genetic material that does not contain nitrogenous bases.

Why is biochemical evidence the strongest form of evolutionary evidence Brainly?

Why is biochemical evidence the strongest form of evolutionary evidence? A) Biochemical evidence can only show us human DNA sequences. Biochemical evidence is based on the fossil record, and shows gradual changes between organisms.

What type of molecule can be used to show an evolutionary relationship?

Scientists can use the DNA from mitochondria, our cell’s energy powerhouses, to construct evolutionary relationships among humans. Mitochondria have their own DNA rather than taking their form from human genetic information.

What is an example of macroevolution?

Examples of macroevolution include: the origin of eukaryotic life forms; the origin of humans; the origin of eukaryotic cells; and extinction of the dinosaurs.

What is a coevolutionary relationship?

The term coevolution is used to describe cases where two (or more) species reciprocally affect each other’s evolution. Coevolution is likely to happen when different species have close ecological interactions with one another. These ecological relationships include: Predator/prey and parasite/host.

Which relationship is an example of coevolution?

Herbivores and plants Similar to the predator-prey relationship, another common example of coevolution is the relationship between herbivore species and the plants that they consume. One example is that of the lodgepole pine seeds, which both red squirrels and crossbills eat in various regions of the Rocky Mountains.

What is Coevolve?

Coevolution, the process of reciprocal evolutionary change that occurs between pairs of species or among groups of species as they interact with one another. The activity of each species that participates in the interaction applies selection pressure on the others.

What is reciprocal selection?

Coevolution, or reciprocal selection, is when each of two interacting species affects the fitnesses of phenotypes in the other species. Mutualistic coevolution is when both species receive a benefit from the coevolutionary relationship.

What is an example of reciprocal altruism?

An example of reciprocal altruism is cleaning symbiosis, such as between cleaner fish and their hosts, though cleaners include shrimps and birds, and clients include fish, turtles, octopuses and mammals.

What is reciprocal recurrent selection?

Reciprocal recurrent selection (RRS) is a cyclical breeding procedure designed to improve the cross of two populations from different heterotic groups by using both general and specific combining ability.

What is recurrent selection?

Recurrent selection is a variation of backcross breeding, where selection for performance is practiced within consecutive segregating progeny generations after the population has undergone selection for the major trait being transferred (Green et al., 2008).

What is recurrent selection for GCA?

Recurrent Selection for General Combining Ability (GCA): A form of recurrent selection used to important the general combining ability of a population for a character and the heterozygous tester is referred as RSGCA. It is also known as half sib recurrent selection.

What is recurrent selection for specific combining ability?

It was proposed by Hull in 1945 with an objective is to isolate lines from a population that will combine very well with a given inbred. Large part of the heterosis is due to non additive gene action i.e. Dominance and epistasis.

What is recurrent parent?

[ri′kər·ənt ′per·ənt] (genetics) In recurrent backcrossing, the parent that is crossed with the first and the subsequent generations. Also known as backcross parent.

What is recurrent parent in Backcrossing?

Backcross breeding enables breeders to transfer a desired trait such as a transgene from one variety (donor parent, DP) into the favored genetic background of another (recurrent parent, RP). If the trait of interest is produced by a dominant gene, this process involves four rounds of backcrossing within seven seasons.

What is non recurrent parent?

The parent of a hybrid that is not again used as a parent in backcrossing.