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2021-05-15

When are you fully vaccinated?

When are you fully vaccinated?

According to the CDC, you’re not considered fully vaccinated until it’s been at least two weeks since your second dose of a two-dose series like Pfizer’s or Moderna’s vaccine, or it’s been two weeks since you received a single-dose vaccine like Johnson & Johnson’s.

Can I get COVID-19 after vaccination?

It typically takes a few weeks after vaccination for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus that causes COVID-19. That means it is possible a person could still get COVID-19 just after vaccination. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

Does the Pfizer Covid vaccine give you covid-19?

No. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine does not contain SARS-CoV-2 and cannot give you COVID-19. When you get your first dose, you will get a vaccination card to show you when to return for your second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine.

Is the covid-19 vaccine effective?

Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Experts also think that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccination is an important tool to help us get back to normal.

Can cold weather and snow prevent the coronavirus disease?

Cold weather and snow CANNOT kill the new coronavirus.There is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases.

What causes COVID-19?

COVID-19 is caused by infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus strain.

What are the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health?

Bereavement, isolation, loss of income and fear are triggering mental health conditions or exacerbating existing ones. Many people may be facing increased levels of alcohol and drug use, insomnia, and anxiety. Meanwhile, COVID-19 itself can lead to neurological and mental complications, such as delirium, agitation, and stroke. People with pre-existing mental, neurological or substance use disorders are also more vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection ̶ they may stand a higher risk of severe outcomes and even death.