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2021-05-15

What are the 4 steps of mitosis in the correct order?

What are the 4 steps of mitosis in the correct order?

Mitosis consists of four basic phases: prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. Some textbooks list five, breaking prophase into an early phase (called prophase) and a late phase (called prometaphase).

What are the stages of interphase in meiosis?

The general steps of meiosis are: interphase (separated into G1, S, and G2 phases), prophase 1, metaphase 1, anaphase 1, telophase 1, prophase 2, metaphase 2, anaphase 2 and telophase 2.

What is the function of interphase?

Interphase is the ‘daily living’ or metabolic phase of the cell, in which the cell obtains nutrients and metabolizes them, grows, replicates its DNA in preparation for mitosis, and conducts other “normal” cell functions. Interphase was formerly called the resting phase.

Why is Interphase called the resting stage?

Originally interphase of the cell cycle was called the “resting stage”, since light microscopy could not detect any activities taking place within the cells. So it was thought that the cell is resting without carrying out any activities

What are the G1 S and G2 phases of interphase?

Interphase is composed of G1 phase (cell growth), followed by S phase (DNA synthesis), followed by G2 phase (cell growth). At the end of interphase comes the mitotic phase, which is made up of mitosis and cytokinesis and leads to the formation of two daughter cells.

What happens at the G2 checkpoint?

The G2 checkpoint ensures all of the chromosomes have been replicated and that the replicated DNA is not damaged before cell enters mitosis. The M checkpoint determines whether all the sister chromatids are correctly attached to the spindle microtubules before the cell enters the irreversible anaphase stage.

Which two events make up the M phase?

The M phase is in turn comprised of two processes: mitosis, in which the cell’s chromosomes are equally divided between the two daughter cells, and cytokinesis (or cell division), in which the cytoplasm of the cell divides in half to form two distinct daughter cells.