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2021-05-14

In which cellular structure would you predict the majority of the radioactive phosphorus to accumulate?

In which cellular structure would you predict the majority of the radioactive phosphorus to accumulate?

NUCLEUS

Which of the following processes is most likely to occur as a result of an animal cell receiving a signal to initiate apoptosis?

Which of the following processes is most likely to occur as a result of an animal cell receiving a signal to initiate apoptosis? Lysosomes will release digestive enzymes into the cytosol.

Which of the following correctly compares the extracellular matrix of animal cells to cell walls of plant cells?

Exam 2 Flashcards

Question Answer
Which of the following correctly compares the extracellular matrix (ECM) of animal cells to cell walls of plant cells? Both the ECM and the plant cell wall are composed of varying mixtures of proteins and carbohydrates.

Which of the following structures is found in an animal cell and not a plant cell?

Animal cells have centrosomes (or a pair of centrioles), and lysosomes, whereas plant cells do not. Plant cells have a cell wall, chloroplasts, plasmodesmata, and plastids used for storage, and a large central vacuole, whereas animal cells do not.

Which structure is most common to plant and animal cells?

Special Structures in Plant Cells Most organelles are common to both animal and plant cells. However, plant cells also have features that animal cells do not have: a cell wall, a large central vacuole, and plastids such as chloroplasts.

Which of the following is not found in animals?

Animal cells each have a centrosome and lysosomes, whereas plant cells do not. Plant cells have a cell wall, chloroplasts and other specialized plastids, and a large central vacuole, whereas animal cells do not.

Which tissue is not found in animal?

In addition, animals possess unique tissues, absent in fungi and plants, which allow coordination (nerve tissue) of motility (muscle tissue). Animals are also characterized by specialized connective tissues that provide structural support for cells and organs.

Which of the following is present in animal cells?

Solution : Nucleus, cell membrane, mitochondria and cytoplasm are present in animal cell.

Do plant cells do endocytosis?

In plants, two endocytic pathways have been identified, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and membrane microdomain-associated endocytosis. Similar to animal cells, CME is the main mechanism for the entry of extracellular material into plant cells.

Does phagocytosis occur in plant cells?

In plants, cells are enclosed by cell walls which obstruct the passage of solid granules. It is natural, therefore, that phagocytosis has not been reported in plant cells. We have found that a plant protoplast is also able to incorporate another protoplast into its vacuole, as described below.

What is the first step in phagocytosis?

The Steps Involved in Phagocytosis

  1. Step 1: Activation of the Phagocyte.
  2. Step 2: Chemotaxis of Phagocytes (for wandering macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils)
  3. Step 3: Attachment of the Phagocyte to the Microbe or Cell.
  4. Step 4: Ingestion of the Microbe or Cell by the Phagocyte.

What is the mechanism of phagocytosis?

Phagocytosis is the mechanism by which relatively large (>0.5 μm) particles, such as bacteria, dead cells, or (as here) polystyrene beads, are internalized (1–3). As receptors bind more and more ligand molecules, the cell membrane progressively engulfs the target.

How do phagocytes kill bacteria?

In general, phagocytes aim to destroy pathogens by engulfing them and subjecting them to a battery of toxic chemicals inside a phagolysosome. If a phagocyte fails to engulf its target, these toxic agents can be released into the environment (an action referred to as “frustrated phagocytosis”).

How can you prevent phagocytosis?

Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by escaping from the phagosome before the lysosome fuses. Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by preventing acidification of the phagosome. Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by resisting killing by lysosomal chemicals.

What facilitates phagocytosis?

In general, the term phagocytosis refers to ingestion of microbes or other particles by professional phagocytic cells. Other plasma proteins that have been reported to opsonize and facilitate ingestion of particles by phagocytic cells include fibronectin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein.

What triggers phagocytosis?

The process of phagocytosis begins with the binding of opsonins (i.e. complement or antibody) and/or specific molecules on the pathogen surface (called pathogen-associated molecular pathogens [PAMPs]) to cell surface receptors on the phagocyte. This causes receptor clustering and triggers phagocytosis.

How do you increase phagocytosis?

Omega 3. Omega 3 fats are also essential. They work by increasing the activity of phagocytes, the white blood cells that destroy bacteria. These fats also help strengthen cell membranes, thereby speeding up healing and strengthening resistance to infection in the body.