Close

2021-07-13

How did Jackson feel about the Indian Removal?

How did Jackson feel about the Indian Removal?

Jackson’s attitude toward Native Americans was paternalistic and patronizing — he described them as children in need of guidance. and believed the removal policy was beneficial to the Indians. Most white Americans thought that the United States would never extend beyond the Mississippi.

What did Andrew Jackson say about the Indian Removal Act?

Jackson declared that removal would incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier. Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.

READ:   What are some new career opportunities in health care that interest you?

Why did Andrew Jackson and most Americans support Indian Removal?

Why did Andrew Jackson and his administration support the Indian Removal Act? They thought of the five “civilized” tribes as uncivilized, or at least some of them did. They also wanted to have the great farming land that tribes like the Cherokee had. They thought having this land would support their economy.

What was the main reason for the Indian Removal Act?

However, more immediate reasons did cause Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act of 1830 during Jackson’s presidency. The factors contributing to the fate of the Cherokees were the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, the issue of states’ rights, and the emergence of scientific racism.

What were the causes and effects of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

Eventually, president Andrew Jackson, decided to pass the Indian removal acts in 1830, which allowed him to move the Indians west. Effects: One major effect is that the Native American population severely decreased. While on the Trail of Tears, many Native Americans endured hypothermia, starvation, and sickness.

How did the Indian Removal Act Impact America?

In 1830, he signed the Indian Removal Act, which gave the federal government the power to exchange Native-held land in the cotton kingdom east of the Mississippi for land to the west, in the “Indian colonization zone” that the United States had acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase.

Who benefited from the Indian Removal Act?

American settlers benefited from the Indian Removal Act. Native cultural groups occupied ancestral lands that were part of many of the southeastern…

What were some economic effects of the Indian Removal Act?

The Indian communities who were relocated West were economically devastated. They were taken from their homes and land with nothing but the clothes on their backs. White settlers, by contrast, gained access to the gold on Indian lands.

READ:   How did the ideas of the Enlightenment lead to revolution?

What was the effect of the Indian Removal Act of 1830 Answers?

Intrusions of land-hungry settlers, treaties with the U.S., and the Indian Removal Act (1830) resulted in the forced removal and migration of many eastern Indian nations to lands west of the Mississippi.

What were the consequences of the Indian Removal Act quizlet?

What were the consequences of the Indian Removal Act? This force the Cherokees to go on a long hard journey from their homeland to Indian territory one fourths of their population died and this was known as the trail of tears. Not all of the Cherokees moved west.

How did the Indian Removal Act of 1830 affect the Cherokee tribe?

In 1830 Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, which authorized the president to negotiate removal treaties. Georgia, the Supreme Court declared that Georgia had violated the Cherokee Nation’s sovereign status and wrongfully intruded into its special treaty relationship with the United States.

What was one result of American Indian removal for the Cherokee?

When George moved the Extend state laws over Cherokee tribal lands in the 1830, the matter went to the U.S Supreme Court. In Cherokee Nation Valley.

How did the Indian Removal Act violate the Constitution?

In 1828, Jackson was elected president. Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress. Members of Congress like Davy Crockett argued that Jackson violated the Constitution by refusing to enforce treaties that guaranteed Indian land rights. But Congress passed the removal law in the spring of 1830.

Why did Congress pass the Indian Removal Act of 1830 Check all that apply?

to make it easier to access gold found on tribal land. to take over the crops that American Indian tribes grew. to keep white settlers from living alongside American Indians. to tap into the skills of American Indian tribes.

READ:   How do you answer why do you want to be a vet?

What was the purpose of the Indian Removal Act quizlet?

Terms in this set (5) Law passed by Congress in 1830 and supported by President Andrew Jackson allowing the U.S. government to remove the Native Americans from their eastern homelands and force them to move west of the Mississippi River.

What was the rationale behind the Indian Removal Act of 1830 quizlet?

The Indian Removal Act was a federal law that President Andrew Jackson promoted. Congress passed the law in 1830. Because Congress wanted to make more land in the Southeast available to white settlers, the law required Native Americans living east of the Mississippi River to move west of it.

How did the Cherokee initially respond to the Indian Removal Act quizlet?

How did the Cherokee react to the Indian Removal Act? The Cherokee Nation did not want to be relocated so they took their case to the Supreme Court. Jackson had disregarded the ruling of the Supreme Court and had ordered the Cherokee to relocate.

What argument did Andrew Jackson use to persuade people that the Indian Removal Act was a good decision?

Which argument did Andrew Jackson use to persuade people that the Indian Removal Act was a good decision? Removing American Indians will alow white settlers to become wealthier.

What were some alternatives to Indian Removal?

These alternative ideas included: peaceful coexistence, commitment to racial harmony, intermarriage, and the creation of an American Indian State within the United States. Peaceful coexistence was the best alternative but it would be difficult to get the whites and Native Americans to agree.