Close

2021-05-14

Do most organisms contain the same codons?

Do most organisms contain the same codons?

Most organisms contain the same codons. Organisms inherit specific traits and characteristics from their parents.

What is the one benefit of mapping the human genome?

Answer: Genome sequencing allows scientists to isolate the DNA of an individual person and identify different codes. Explanation: Its main benefit in the field of medicine is locating chromosomal abnormalities that cause diseases before they develop into chronic, life-threatening diseases.

Is DNA is replicated which DNA base pair will bond to cytosine?

As DNA is replicated the DNA base that will pair with cytosine is guanine. There are four possible bases in DNA, cytosine, guanine, adenine and…

READ:   Under what conditions would a coarse grained igneous rock form?

Which factor of genetic code makes organisms different from one another?

Answer: The correct answer would be the order of the codons. The nucleotide sequence of DNA (deoxiribonucleic acid) is the main factor which makes organisms different from each other.

What occurs during translation?

In translation, messenger RNA (mRNA) is decoded in a ribosome, outside the nucleus, to produce a specific amino acid chain, or polypeptide. The polypeptide later folds into an active protein and performs its functions in the cell.

Which best summarizes the process of protein synthesis?

RNA moves the DNA code to the ribosomes for protein synthesis is the best way to summarize the process of protein synthesis

What must occur for protein translation to begin?

A water molecule must be added to the protein chain. A peptide bond must form between subunits of mRNA. The amino acid Cys must be picked up by tRNA

Which of these is the primary site of protein synthesis?

Ribosomes

What is the first thing that happens during transcription?

Transcription begins when RNA polymerase binds to a promoter sequence near the beginning of a gene (directly or through helper proteins). RNA polymerase uses one of the DNA strands (the template strand) as a template to make a new, complementary RNA molecule.

READ:   What is the synonym of explain?

What is transcription in simple terms?

Definitions. Transcription is the process of making an RNA copy of a gene sequence. This copy, called a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule, leaves the cell nucleus and enters the cytoplasm, where it directs the synthesis of the protein, which it encodes

How does a translator help communication?

They enhance communication by conveying information accurately from one language to another in different countries across the world. These translators and interpreters provide different services. Medical translators also help translate patients’ journals and hospital information brochures into patients’ languages.

What usually terminates the process of translation?

Translation ends in a process called termination. Termination happens when a stop codon in the mRNA (UAA, UAG, or UGA) enters the A site. Stop codons are recognized by proteins called release factors, which fit neatly into the P site (though they aren’t tRNAs).

Do most organisms contain the same codons?

Most organisms contain the same codons. Organisms inherit specific traits and characteristics from their parents.

Is DNA is replicated which DNA base pair will bond to cytosine?

As DNA is replicated the DNA base that will pair with cytosine is guanine. There are four possible bases in DNA, cytosine, guanine, adenine and…

Which is one benefit of mapping the human genome?

locating the chromosomal abnormalities that cause disease having the genomes of every living individual on file choosing the gender or intellectual ability of an unborn child cloning the individuals that comprise a nearly extinct tribe.

What will happen if the DNA code contains errors?

When there is a mistake in the copying of the genetic message that is permanent, a mutation has occurred. Two of the bases in DNA (Cytosine and Thymine) are the most vulnerable, and when this happens, they may pair with each other or themselves and the message is changed.

What happens if DNA is altered?

When a gene mutation occurs, the nucleotides are in the wrong order which means the coded instructions are wrong and faulty proteins are made or control switches are changed. The body can’t function as it should. Mutations can be inherited from one or both parents. They are present in the egg and/ or sperm cells.

READ:   Does facilitated diffusion go from low to high concentration?

What is a mistake in DNA called?

mistakes are called. mutations. mutations are. changes in the sequence of DNA.

What happens if mutations are not corrected?

Mutations can occur during DNA replication if errors are made and not corrected in time. However, mutation can also disrupt normal gene activity and cause diseases, like cancer. Cancer is the most common human genetic disease; it is caused by mutations occurring in a number of growth-controlling genes.

How does DNA polymerase make mistakes?

Most of the mistakes during DNA replication are promptly corrected by DNA polymerase which proofreads the base that has just been added. In proofreading, the DNA pol reads the newly-added base before adding the next one so a correction can be made. This is performed by the exonuclease action of DNA pol III.

What happens if transcription goes wrong?

Mutations that happen during Transcription and Translation What happens if there is a mistake (mutation) in the DNA code? Possibly proteins won’t be made or are made improperly. If the mutations occur in the gametes, the offspring’s DNA will be affected positively, negatively, or neutrally.

What happens if DNA polymerase 1 is not present?

DNA polymerase I is strikingly important for survival of the cell following many types of DNA damage, and in its absence, the cell has persistent single-stranded breaks that promote DNA recombination.

What is the main job of DNA polymerase?

The primary role of DNA polymerases is to accurately and efficiently replicate the genome in order to ensure the maintenance of the genetic information and its faithful transmission through generations.

Why does DNA polymerase go from 5 to 3?

Since DNA polymerase requires a free 3′ OH group for initiation of synthesis, it can synthesize in only one direction by extending the 3′ end of the preexisting nucleotide chain. Hence, DNA polymerase moves along the template strand in a 3’–5′ direction, and the daughter strand is formed in a 5’–3′ direction.

What is the difference between DNA polymerase 1 and 3?

The main difference between DNA polymerase 1 and 3 is that DNA polymerase 1 is involved in the removal of primers from the fragments and replacing the gap by relevant nucleotides whereas DNA polymerase 3 is mainly involved in the synthesis of the leading and lagging strands.

READ:   How are convection currents affected by the rotation of the earth?

Is DNA a polymerase?

DNA polymerase is an enzyme that synthesizes DNA molecules from deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA. DNA polymerase adds nucleotides to the three prime end of a DNA strand one nucleotide at a time. When a cell divides, DNA polymerases are needed so that the cell’s DNA can duplicate.

How many DNA polymerases do humans have?

14 DNA

Does DNA polymerase require a primer?

To initiate this reaction, DNA polymerases require a primer with a free 3′-hydroxyl group already base-paired to the template. They cannot start from scratch by adding nucleotides to a free single-stranded DNA template. RNA polymerase, in contrast, can initiate RNA synthesis without a primer (Section 28.1. 4).

What are the two main functions of DNA polymerase?

Answer: The main function of DNA polymerase is to make DNA from nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. There are several forms of DNA polymerase that play a role in DNA replication and they usually work in pairs to copy one molecule of double-stranded DNA into two new double stranded DNA molecules.

What is the role of Primase?

Primase is an enzyme that synthesizes short RNA sequences called primers. Since primase produces RNA molecules, the enzyme is a type of RNA polymerase. Primase functions by synthesizing short RNA sequences that are complementary to a single-stranded piece of DNA, which serves as its template.

Why does DNA polymerase need a primer?

The synthesis of a primer is necessary because the enzymes that synthesize DNA, which are called DNA polymerases, can only attach new DNA nucleotides to an existing strand of nucleotides. The primer therefore serves to prime and lay a foundation for DNA synthesis.

What is the role of DNA polymerase 3?

DNA Polymerase III, Bacterial DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) is an enzyme that catalyzes elongation of DNA chains during bacterial chromosomal DNA replication. Together with a DNA helicase and a primase, Pol III HE participates in the replicative apparatus that acts at the replication fork.

Why do Okazaki fragments form?

Okazaki fragments form because the lagging strand that is being formed have to be formed in segments of 100–200 nucleotides. This is done DNA polymerase making small RNA primers along the lagging strand which are produced much more slowly than the process of DNA synthesis on the leading strand.

READ:   How many stages are there in Lysogenic cycle?

Is DNA polymerase III found in eukaryotes?

The chloroplast also has DNA pol γ. On top of the pols α, δ and ε eukaryotes have lots of repair enzymes: pols β, η, ι, κ and ζ. Not only do we have different enzymes but eukaryotic cells have more copies of these enzymes than do prokaryotes. coli has 10 to 20 molecules of DNA pol III.

What are the 4 steps of replication?

  • Step 1: Replication Fork Formation. Before DNA can be replicated, the double stranded molecule must be “unzipped” into two single strands.
  • Step 2: Primer Binding. The leading strand is the simplest to replicate.
  • Step 3: Elongation.
  • Step 4: Termination.

What are the steps of replication?

Replication occurs in three major steps: the opening of the double helix and separation of the DNA strands, the priming of the template strand, and the assembly of the new DNA segment. During separation, the two strands of the DNA double helix uncoil at a specific location called the origin.

What is replication process?

DNA replication is the process by which a double-stranded DNA molecule is copied to produce two identical DNA molecules. Replication is an essential process because, whenever a cell divides, the two new daughter cells must contain the same genetic information, or DNA, as the parent cell.

Where does DNA replication start?

Where does DNA replication start? How many origins of replication are there in a cell? How does DNA replication start? DNA replication starts with the binding of proteins to the origin of replication, opening up a replication bubble in the DNA.

Can DNA replication start anywhere?

False DNA synthesis can start anywhere on a chromosome. False DNA synthesis starts only at one place on a chromosome. True DNA synthesis starts at specific locations on a chromosome. False DNA synthesis starts at every location at exactly the same time.

Where does DNA replication end?

Eukaryotes initiate DNA replication at multiple points in the chromosome, so replication forks meet and terminate at many points in the chromosome. Because eukaryotes have linear chromosomes, DNA replication is unable to reach the very end of the chromosomes.